Use CCleaner? Read this.

CCleaner is a popular program for cleaning up computers. Amongst the host of similar programs out there, CCleaner is the only one I’ve used and trusted, for many years. This week, that trust has been undermined fundamentally.

A version of CCleaner was released during August that contained malicious code, presumably without the developers’ knowledge – though it could well have been an inside job. Anyone installing CCleaner during August/early September may have installed the compromised version of CCleaner – version 5.33.

This is serious. CCleaner is powerful software. The injected code would run with at least the same power of CCleaner, which means it could potentially:

  • Watch your browsing activity
  • Capture passwords
  • Steal your files
  • Compromise your online banking credentials
  • Delete arbitrary data
  • Encrypt files

And so on.

You can see if you’re at risk by running CCleaner and checking the version number:

If you have version 5.33 version installed, I strongly recommend taking the following steps:

  • Uninstall CCleaner immediately
  • Change all passwords you use with the affected computer – including online passwords, banking passwords, etc.
  • Review bank account and credit card statements for unusual activity

In many cases, you can add an extra layer of protection to your passwords by using “two factor authentication” (Google calls it 2-step verification). When logging into certain services, you will be prompted to enter a code from a text message or app. Even if your password has been compromised, two-factor authentication makes it that bit harder for others to gain access to your accounts.

For more information on two factor authentication (“2FA”):

CNET: Two factor authentication what you need to know
PCMag: Two factor authentication – who has it and how to set it up

For a list of services known to support 2FA:

TwoFactorAuth.org

Cisco’s security research team Talos advises that the ultimate target seems to be prominent tech companies. There’s evidence to suggest that a Chinese group has used this injected malware to launch further targeted attacks on companies like Sony, Intel, Samsung, Microsoft and several others. The most likely objective here is to steal intellectual property.

Should that make us any less concerned? Probably not. Such a serious compromise in a widespread, popular program undermines trust in software supply chains generally. There isn’t an awful lot we can do to defend against this sort of approach, other than to proceed with caution when installing any software. Best to stay away from the latest, bleeding-edge releases, perhaps.

Avast, the popular antivirus manufacturer owns CCleaner. If this can happen to a leading software security company, it can happen to anyone.

Run for the hills!!! πŸ˜€

The UK Data Protection Bill arrives

It’s the moment we’ve all been waiting for… The government has now published the Data Protection Bill, which is intended primarily to enshrine the equivalent EU law. This nascent legislation, which confirms the powers of the ICO, covers:

  • EU regulation 2016/679 (the General Data Protection Regulation), which comes into force in the EU on 25 May 2018
  • EU directive 2016/680 (the Law Enforcement Directive), which comes into force in the EU on 6 May 2018

The GDPR runs to 88 pages and the LED 43, so perhaps it’s no great surprise that the Data Protection Bill weighs in at a hefty 218 pages. (Wide margins, so that’s something.) It’s going to take a while to wade through, but what we can say immediately is that it’s every bit as bad as we feared. Certainly the €20m/4% fines have survived the translation into Britlaw.

Unlike GDPR, the DPB has a contents page, which is great. It’ll be that bit easier to look up how much trouble we’re in.

Expect the Bill to come into force largely unchanged, probably by next May and definitely before Brexit.

Integrating OCS Inventory with Rundeck

I’ve been on a DevOps journey for a while now. If you’re in a similar place – am I just a dullard, or is it slow going?!

I work mainly at the Ops side of the equation, in an environment that strongly favours open source solutions. Most recently I’ve been focusing on automating asset management/inventory. For this, OCS Inventory NG fits the bill well. The interface isn’t that slick, and I couldn’t for the life of me get the Active Directory integration working, but for collecting software and hardware inventory, it’s the bomb.

In a mixed estate (Windows/Linux/Mac), I can use Group Policy, Rudder and Meraki respectively to force the OCS agent onto endpoints. Which means I can just sit back and let my CMDB populate itself. Awesome. (Because who’s got time to keep these things updated themselves, right?)

This inventory automation was a prerequisite for Rundeck. Since you’re here, you probably already know, but just in case you don’t: Rundeck is a fantastic tool for wrapping policies around any task you can dream of. You can use it for centralised job scheduling, you can use it to allow your developers to reboot servers without giving them SSH access, and you have ACLs and a full audit trail for everything.

For Rundeck to be any use, it needs a list of servers to control, which brings me back to OCS Inventory. OCS knows about my servers, so let’s just get Rundeck talking to OCS. Then Rundeck will have an always-up-to-date list of server endpoints, with no human input required. Marvellous.

My weapon of choice here is PHP, because I know it and because all the required components for this script are already installed on the OCS Inventory server. The simple prerequisites:

  1. Ensure all servers are tagged on their way into OCS Inventory. I use the installation switch /TAG="SERVER" with the OCS agent.
  2. On the OCS Inventory server, create a read-only MySQL user for the script. I created the user “rundeck@localhost” (so its purpose was clear) and gave it the minimum permissions – SELECT on the accountinfo and hardware OCS tables.

I created a PHP script in the OCS Inventory web root. For me that’s at /usr/share/ocsinventory-reports/ocsreports. I called the script rundeck-xml.php. And here’s the code:

<?php
// OCS inventory integration into Rundeck.
$host = "127.0.0.1";
$db = "ocsweb";
$user = "rundeck";
$pwd = "PASSWORD GOES HERE";

$link = mysqli_connect($host, $user, $pwd, $db);

if (mysqli_connect_errno()) {
    printf("Connect failed: %s\n", mysqli_connect_error());
    exit();
}


// Select all devices tagged as "SERVER" in the OCS database
$query = "
    SELECT `NAME`, `WORKGROUP`, `OSNAME`, `OSVERSION`, `OSCOMMENTS`, `IPADDR`, `DESCRIPTION`, `ARCH` FROM hardware
    LEFT JOIN accountinfo ON hardware.`ID` = accountinfo.`HARDWARE_ID`
    WHERE accountinfo.`TAG` LIKE '%SERVER%'
    ORDER BY `NAME`
";


if($result = mysqli_query($link, $query)) {
    // Start XML
    header('Content-type: text/xml');
    echo "<project>\n";

    while($row = mysqli_fetch_object($result))
    {
        echo "    <node name=\"{$row->NAME}\" type=\"node\"\n";
        echo "        hostname=\"{$row->NAME}.{$row->WORKGROUP}\"\n";
        echo "        osName=\"{$row->OSNAME}\"\n";
        echo "        osVersion=\"{$row->OSVERSION}\"\n";
        // Architecture is either in the DESCRIPTION field (for Ubuntu) or ARCH field (for Windows)
        $arch = (isset($row->ARCH) ? $row->ARCH : $row->DESCRIPTION);
        echo "        osArch=\"$arch\"\n";
        echo "    />\n";
    }
    mysqli_free_result($result);

    echo "</project>\n";
}
?>

Possibly not the most elegant code, but it gets the job done. Further security is left as an exercise for the reader. πŸ˜‰

Referring to the database and the RESOURCE-XML Rundeck schema, you can extend this script to suit your needs. Add this to your Rundeck project configuration as an external resource model, with the URL of the above script. E.g. http://ocsserver.domain.com/ocsreports/rundeck-xml.php. All being well, every server from OCS Inventory will now appear as a node in Rundeck.